New moose tag allocation process explained online

by Steve Galea | November 25, 2020
Moose

A Government of Ontario web page that explains how to navigate through the new points-based moose tag allocation process went online in mid-October.

The changes described take effect in 2021.

Comprehensive resource

Among other things, the page provides a comprehensive overview of how the new system works, what hunters need to be aware of, costs, as well as a time-table for hunters to follow so they can meet all the deadlines in the tag allocation process. 

The site also explains the rationale for the changes and suggests strategies for groups to follow to make the most of the new system. It tells hunters how to find their draw history as well as the number of points they have accumulated, which will be made available in early 2021. (Hunters will be awarded one point for every year they applied for the moose draw since last receiving an adult tag. Points will be awarded dating as far back as 1993.)

Highest points awarded

This is important since, under the new rules, tags in any given Wildlife Management Unit are awarded to the individual hunters with the highest points who apply. Any hunter who has not drawn a tag can buy a licence and party hunt with a hunter who has a tag, however. Once a hunter has been awarded a tag, his or her point total reverts back to zero.

Other issues covered include new regulations regarding tag transfers and hunting moose with a tourist outfitter.

OFAH provides platform

The Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters (OFAH) is monitoring the changes.

“We want to hear from hunters as they are interacting with this new system,” said OFAH Wildlife Biologist Dr. Keith Munro. “We are committed to taking that feedback to the MNRF so they fully understand how these changes are being received. Our goal is to make sure that Ontario has a moose hunting system that works for our members and the broader moose hunting community.”

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Comments

  1. James Robert McConachie wrote: I beg you to please have no stand alone calf tag ever , and the cow/calf tag every 2nd or 3rd year . There are too many moose hunters that can not tell the difference ,between a cow and a calf , that’s why we hear horror stories of moose being left to rot . We all have to give a bit , to get the population higher for a few years
  2. George Thayer wrote: If u missed entering the moose draw say in 2015 And hadnt gotten a tag since 2000, do u have 10 pts or 5
    • Meghan Sutherland wrote: George, Presumably if you applied every year since 2005 except in 2015 up until 2020, you would have 19 points. You will be able to access your points total when the allocation is fully launched next year (2021).
  3. RONALD MOORE wrote: prices and dates of application
    • Meghan Sutherland wrote: Ronald, you can find this link attached within the story: https://www.ontario.ca/page/points-based-moose-tag-allocation-process
  4. John Prud’homme wrote: It’s about time they go to a point system. It will be fare for everyone. Since I’m on pension, too bad there making a money bag for m.n.r.f. Buy making you pay if you get a tag. I don’t understand what that is all about, concerned Canadian.
  5. Rick Marshall wrote: My problem with the new system that I don't know much about yet is that are gang always wants to go moose hunting and we will change areas to get a adult tag. So because we will travel long distances to hunt now were being discriminated against for getting tags. We use to hunt area 40 and loved it but we could not draw so how is it fair that we traveled to 18A this year to get tags and now they hold it against us. With no calf tags without entering a draw if we do not receive a tag we will not be able to go. My work as well as other guys in the gang have to submit for holidays in January and February. Just a couple problems I have saw in the system so far.
  6. Charlie Hardy wrote: Why do we shot cows and calf’s anyway. Farmers don’t kill breeding animals. Why shot a cow that brings in a possible chance of twins or even a calf period. The wolf’s and bears are hard enough these animals, let alone the natives that are out there shooting as many as they please. I know of places where they have shot 50 to 60 moose, that doesn’t help the moose population.
  7. Fern wrote: If I get a tag in the draw can the rest of my group hunt with me.
    • Meghan Sutherland wrote: Fern, from https://www.ontario.ca/document/ontario-hunting-regulations-summary/general-regulations: Party hunting A person may hunt moose, deer, or black bear in a party of two or more people who each hold a licence to hunt that species, even if the person has already invalidated their tag for that species. In these cases, at least one member of the party must hold a tag that has not yet been invalidated, and the group must comply with the following conditions: each person must have a valid licence to hunt the big game species being hunted the total number of moose, elk, deer or bear of a specified sex, age or type killed by the party does not exceed the total number of tags for that sex, age or type held by the members of the party all members of the party must hunt together in the same Wildlife Management Unit or portion thereof, for which the tag is valid each member of the party must hunt within 5 kilometres of the person who holds the tag that is valid for the wildlife being hunted each member of the party must be able to reliably and immediately communicate with other members of the party all members of the party, including the person who holds the tag that is valid for the species that the party is hunting, must actively participate in the hunt and hunt co-operatively Party hunting is also permitted for elk in accordance with the conditions noted above, however some additional rules apply - refer to the elk section for these additional rules. The person who kills the animal while hunting in a party shall immediately notify all other members of the party that the animal has been killed. If the tag holder is not the person who kills the animal, the tag holder must immediately go to the kill site, confirm the type/sex/age of the animal and then invalidate their tag. Refer to the tags section for more information. If you have questions about party hunting, the best time to get answers is before the hunt begins. Contact your local MNRF district office or Natural Resources Information Support Centre (NRISC) at 1-800-387-7011, 1-800-667-1940, or NRISC@ontario.ca. Note: The term ‘invalidated tag’ refers to a tag that has been notched by the tag holder immediately after the kill, at the site of the kill and before moving the animal. Refer to the tags section for additional information.
  8. Randy Krawchuk wrote: If I’m not mistaken, they tried this point system years ago, but it didn’t go? That being said, how many total points do u need before receiving a tag?
    • Alesha Howran wrote: Randy, from the site included in the article: https://www.ontario.ca/page/points-based-moose-tag-allocation-process#section-4 “Point totals The minimum point total awarded each tag type will likely be variable in the first few years of the tag allocation process because: hunters will be using their accumulated points and developing application strategies; and tag quotas may change in response to the implementation of calf tag quotas and new bow quotas” We’ll have more information as the allocation process rolls out.