Posts Tagged ‘Muskie fishing’

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Using big suckers for muskie

Using live bait for muskie is a tradition that spans generations of angling. Strategies and equipment evolved, one fact remains: muskies eat live suckers.

Muskie Killer
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Speed spinning for muskie

Very few things in muskie fishing are set in stone. However, high-speed fishing, especially trolling, works.

Scott McGuigan holding Lake St. Clair walleye
Travel
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Lake St. Clair: a fishery on fire

Change a few lyrics around and Alicia Keys’ anthem hit, “Girl on Fire” could easily be an ode to the great fishing happening on Lake St. Clair.

Muskie
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Finding muskie in transition

During every muskie season, there’s a period when it’s no longer summer but it’s not really quite fall, either.

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Extolling the joys of topwater fishing

The plug sat still on the water, with just a few ripples circling out from where it had landed. I popped the rod tip down, and the plug shot a spray of water forward, its cupped nose making a loud, distinctive gurgle.

Muskie
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Catching muskie fever

The strange attraction and appeal of muskie fishing is difficult to explain to a normal person. A large part of that is catching huge fish.

angler holding giant muskie in boat
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Avoiding muskie mistakes

Muskie are known as the fish of 10,000 casts, and for good reason — they’re hard to catch. Even when things go well, there is a thin margin between being a “zero” and a “hero.” When catching just one fish is the measure of success, even a small mistake can lead to failure and heartbreak.

muskie fishing in the Canadian Shield
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Muskie fishing in the Canadian Shield

When muskie fishing in the Canadian Shield – where some of the best muskie water on earth is found – it’s as simple as working rocks, weeds, and depth.

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Muskie in the fast lane

Summer. Iced tea on the dock. Siestas under the big willow tree. Air conditioners humming. Nothing moves too fast during the hot days of late June, July, and August, at least above the water. Down in the lake, things are a bit different.